Skip to content
3 February 2016 / NHamilton

Citizens Make a Difference Together at Transport for Cairo

Cairo from Below co-founder Nicholas Hamilton interviews Transport for Cairo co-founders Mohamed Hegazy and Houssam Elokda

Visualization of Cairo's Buses and Metro - routes and stops by Transport for Cairo

Visualization of Cairo’s Buses and Metro – routes and stops by Transport for Cairo

 

How was the idea of Transport for Cairo born? 

Houssam: I was walking down the street when I got a rambling call from my long-time friend Hegazy about a project in Nairobi he had just learned about.  He told me about a team that had put together a map of the city’s “informal” microbus system and opened the data to all.  It was called Digital Matatus.  Hegazy said he thought we could bring the idea to Cairo where privately run microbuses cover a huge share of the city’s transportation needs.  I was so excited about the idea that I stopped walking, went into the nearest coffee shop, and opened my laptop to start researching.  I became obsessed with the question of how we–as private citizens–could provide millions of Egyptians access to useful knowledge about the existing transport network and empower them to use that knowledge to improve their daily lives.  We established the basics of our research methodology and started Transport for Cairo that day!

 

What does data have to do with getting around a city?  What are hoping to achieve with this project? 

Houssam: The whole purpose of this project is to ease people’s access to public transport in Cairo.  Before you can think about designing improvements to a transit system, you must first understand the system you have.  We want to get this data to as many people as possible.  We want public and private transit operators, researchers, private app developers and the public to make inquiries with this data, to understand the system as it is.

M. Hegazy: Look, if you go to a trip planning website like Google Maps or Bey2ollak–which is one of the most popular apps in Egypt today–they can only give you driving directions, or maybe walking. They can’t give you public transit options because no one has collected that information or made it accessible, so it encourages people to take a car because they don’t have reliable information on public transit options.

We started with the idea to map Cairo’s microbuses because no map exists thinking we could integrate that microbus information with the government owned bus and Metro systems.  We quickly learned there isn’t complete information on the Metro or the government owned buses–let alone the microbuses–that is available to the public, app developers, or to researchers.  You need standardized data about routes, stops, trip length and schedules to make a map and power trip planning software, a type of data programmers call GTFS or General Transit Feed Specification.

This isn’t easy in the best of circumstances, but you need to understand how huge and complex the transportation system in Cairo is.  Greater Cairo is home to 18 million residents, 20 on weekdays and rapidly growing in both geography and population.  The Metro has 61 stations; it is 65 km long and expanding.  There are somewhere between 450 to 880 government owned bus lines, and those two systems don’t satisfy Cairo’s transport needs so we also have the additional transportation system of microbuses, which are further sub-categorized into ones with license to run on particular routes, unlicensed ones on particular routes, and unlicensed ones that run in general directions similar to a shared taxi.  No one really knows how many run, what routes they follow, or how many people use informal bus system, but the assumption goes that it covers 40% of the city’s transport needs, which is on par with the public bus system.

How do Cairenes get transit information right now?  How does this compare with other types of information access?

Hossam: Right now knowledge about the public transport system is mostly orally transmitted and there is a lot of uncertainty about the quickest option.  Making transport data available will put knowledge of the fastest and cheapest routes at the touch of your fingers: you will be able to use apps on every smart phone to tell you how to get somewhere and how long it will take.

M. Hegazy: With the exception of the Metro, there is very little information for me as a citizen to access. The government publishes a PDF document with the public bus routes, but it ends there. Even if the data exists, it isn’t publicly accessible and can’t be used for trip planning.

Do you need a smartphone to benefit from Transport for Cairo?

Houssam: There is a big misconception that people in the developing world don’t have smart phones.  In Egypt, smartphone usage is currently at 15.5 million users–who have data plans–and growing.  Over the next three years, it is projected to increase to 28 million, or more than 50% of the adult pop of the country.

A privately operated minibus under license from the Egyptian authorities (Creative Commons CC-0)

A privately operated minibus under license from the Egyptian authorities (Creative Commons CC-0)

M. Hegazy: Let me address another common misconception. Public transit users are not only of poor status, everyone uses public transit. People with smartphones are increasingly on public transit. This is true the world over where free wifi and cell service is being rolled out underground.  Also, while we envision printed system maps could be produced, there is one final misconception worth addressing.  Changes don’t have to be universal to be helpful: even an incremental improvement can have huge positive impact and be worthwhile.

 

You mentioned earlier the Digital Matatus project in Nairobi.  I’m a big fan of the project and had the privilege of being involved in some of its early planning.  Could you describe how that project unfolded and how Transport for Cairo is different?

M. Hegazy: I learned about Digital Matatus in the free, online book Beyond Transparency, and then learned more from online urban sources like Wired, Atlantic and Guardian and academic papers. The team there spent months riding the matatus recording thousands of stops and hundreds of routes with a custom app and GPS from sources. We subsequently met and sought advice from some of the university partners of the project such as Professor Jacqueline Klopp at Columbia University’s Center for Sustainable Urban Development, and Sarah Williams, Director of the Civic Data Design Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). [Disclosure: Professor Klopp is also an adviser to Cairo from Below].  From them we learned how important institutional partnerships would be to successfully implementing the work.

Microbuses lined up under the Dokki Flyover (Creative Commons CC-0)

Microbuses lined up under the Dokki Flyover (Creative Commons CC-0)

One of the challenges we face here in Cairo is that the city is three or four times as populous and large as Nairobi.  Unlike Nairobi and its matatus, Cairo’s system isn’t primarily centered on microbuses. Cairo has many types of mass transit: the Metro, buses and microbuses–in addition to walking and other forms of non-motorized transit which are often overlooked when talking about transportation.

 

The microbuses have a complex identity in Cairo and elsewhere. Here people know they are usually the fastest option and often the cheapest, but they are sometimes also viewed as polluting, and prone to aggressive drivers and accidents.  As researchers we also recognize it is a system highly adaptive to supply and demand, and is not centrally planned by anyone.  One of our research questions seeks to analyze the system’s resiliency in the face of the unexpected.

We started with mapping a couple of microbus routes, looked at the data and realized we had to revise our strategy.  We found through our research that for Transport for Cairo to put meaningful data into the hands of citizens, the project needed to get way bigger and encompass all forms of mass transit data.  We had to map the entire system.

This is a huge undertaking, how can a team of eight researchers map the entire transportation system of one of the world’s largest cities?

M. Hegazy: The short answer is step by step. Our team of eight mostly volunteers wouldn’t get anywhere if we tried to map the whole of Cairo at once so we broke the now much larger project into phases. The first phase was creating and publishing a full set of data for the Metro.  That phase is done so people can now at least begin developing apps to provide trip planning that includes the Metro.  We did the easiest part first to prove to ourselves and others that we had something meaningful to contribute.

The World Bank has mapped 450 of Cairo's 880 public bus routes as well as the Metro system, but did not include information on stop locations (image and project described on World Bank website)

The World Bank has mapped 450 of Cairo’s 880 public bus routes as well as the Metro system, but did not include information on stop locations (image and project described on World Bank website)

The next phase was government owned buses.  The World Bank had done an earlier project on the GIS mapping of the official bus lines, but not stops, trip length or frequency so it wasn’t helpful in trip planning.  Because the World Bank has been open to sharing their data, we are currently creating a full GTFS dataset for the buses.  We can create a first version of this data without fieldwork.  Stations may not be identified with a sign, but they emerge in practice.

 

Houssam:  Our contribution is to deduce the rules and patterns that tell you most of what you need to know about how people move within the city: to understand the logic of a seemingly out of control system.  To see the structure of this complex system you need to collect lots, and lots of data, analyze it and clean out the noise.  The city may have grown organically, but it and its transport grew according to rules.  We are writing those rules down for the first time in the form GTFS dataset for buses.  This will be a huge step forward, but is only the means to the end.

The end is something people in New York and other large cities now take for granted: an accessible map and trip planning on multiple platforms in the palm of their hand.  Like Digital Matatus, as Transport for Cairo we are part of a global discussion underway about how to democratize technology.  We are learning how to make global technology standards like GTFS, which was designed for Europe and the US, work for the cities of the developing world.

What comes next?  What kind of reception have you been getting?

M. Hegazy: The next phases will depend on funding and partnerships. We need to field test and verify this data for both the government owned buses and the microbuses. There is a lot of work still to do.

People in the planning domain here in Cairo are excited about this and they also are guarded because they aren’t sure it can be done and because others have tried this before.  People give us credit for having such rigorous research methodology.  Partnerships with universities, international organizations, and the Egyptian government will give us an even stronger legitimacy as we move forward.  We are actively looking for both funding and partnerships.

Tell me a little about who you are and what from your personal backgrounds led you to start Transport for Cairo?  What holds this group together?

IMG_4793

Transport for Cairo Team: Clockwise, from top left: M. Mahrous, I. Gaber, E. Ebeid, M. Hegazy, R. Zeid and A. Hegazy (Missing are: H. Elokda, T. Taha).

Houssam: We were united by an experience shared among every person who’s lived in Cairo.  Transportation is a source of infinite stress, pollution and uncertainty about how to get places and how long it will take.  The best way to address this is through public transit, yet that same transit is difficult for anyone to understand.  Anyone who has seen trip planning for mass transit online or when traveling abroad wants to be able to do it back home in Cairo.

M. Hegazy: There are eight of us working on TfC, we come from many backgrounds but are united by a passion for research with real world applications. I am an economist by training and had worked in software development. Houssam grew up in Cairo and came from research and urban planning background and works to improve cities around the world.  Others in our team include a programmer, two urban researchers, a GIS professional, an experienced business developer and an information technology professional working on his PhD.  Our work has been advanced entirely through self-funding and dedicated volunteer efforts. Ensuring that the data we generate remains open and accessible as a public good fundamentally glued our team together.  We’re actively trying to attract grant funding to make this possible.

What is the most important thing to remember about Transport for Cairo?

Houssam: It is possible for a group of passionate researchers to touch millions of people’s lives through a project like putting smart trip planning for mass transit in the public’s hands, even in a city as large as Cairo.  We hope to be a part of a conversation about how the city’s transportation actually functions so we can begin the later work of thinking about how to improve a transport system as complex as Cairo’s.  We are fundamentally researchers and decades of research has shown that adding cars, widening roads, removing trams, and building peripheral cities outside of town does not alleviate congestion, and associated negative economic and environmental impacts.  We hope our work contributes to people finding good public transit options for all Egyptians.

M. Hegazy will be discussing Transport for Cairo at a session of the LOTE5 conference in February in Brussels.

[This interview was edited and abridged]

24 December 2015 / marouhhussein

Cairo’s Metropolitan Landscape: Segregation Extreme – Now in Arabic!

[Note: Complete text in English below]

فيما يلي مقتطفات من مقال “محيط العاصمة القاهرة : الفصل المتطرف ” لكاتبه عبدالبصير محمد، لقراءة نص المقال كاملاً اتبع الرابط في الأسفل.

تكشف أنماط التوسع العمراني لمنطقة العاصمة القاهرة عن مدينة مفتتة لأجزاء غير متجانسة، فبإعتباري متخصص تخطيط عمراني وأيضاً قاهري، فأنا أميل إلي توصيف المدينة كسلسلة من الجزر الصغيرة المنعزلة عن بعضها بحواجز مادية مُحكمة: جدران، طرق سريعة، كباري عُلوية، مواقع عسكرية، وجهات مائية مهجورة، مواقف سيارات وأراضي شاغرة تتشارك جميعها في مدينة سمتها الأساسية نقص الاتساق والتجانس، بالإضافة إلي عدم وجود أماكن عامة تستوعب الفئات المجتمعية المختلفة، بل وتقوم كل فئة اجتماعية بحصر نفسها في حي منفصل على الأحرى.

تاريخ حافل من الفصل العمراني

يعتبر الفصل و التمييز العمراني سمة متأصلة في تاريخ القاهرة، فالقاهرة الفاطمية ( 969 م) كانت مدينة مسورة بالجدران أنشأت للنُخبة الحاكمة بشكل حصري، وفي العصر العثماني ( م1517- م 1798)، كانت الحارة -حي سكني مسوَّر على الأغلب- هي وحدة العمران الأساسية للمدينة، حيث تقع الحارات الفقيرة على أطرافها بينما الحارات البرجوازية والثرية يمكن أن نجدها في المركز، وعلى حد قول عالمة الاجتماع المصرية نوال المسيري “فالعيش في حارة، المغلق منها على وجه الخصوص، كان كالعيش في مملكة خاصة بالمرء، فالمنطقة كانت تحت إشراف ولم يسمح لأي شخص من الخارج بالدخول”،واستمرت هذة المحركات في العصر المملوكي، فقام الأمراء بإحاطة ضواحي المدينة بتكتلات وسوروا بيوتهم بالحدائق كي يعزلوا أنفسهم عن عامة الشعب، ومنذ عهد أقرب، بالمدينة الخديوية (م1869) – والتي اعدت بشكل رئيسي للأجانب والمصريين الأثرياء- فشيدت على أرض شاغرة في غرب المدينة القديمة (إلا أنها احتوت على مساكن الطبقة العاملة في نهاية الأمر). إن دراسة تاريخ المدينة الحافل يوضح لنا أن القاهرة أشبه بالإناء المتصدع الذي تم حفر هذة الكسور في ذاكرته عبر القرون، وبنظرة خاطفة على تاريخ القاهرة الحديث يتضح لنا أن هذة الكسور مستمرة إلي يومنا هذا.

لنص المقال الكامل، اضغط هنا http://www.failedarchitecture.com/cairos-metropolitan-landscape-segregation-extreme/

عبدالبصير محمد معماري ومخطط عمراني، حصل على درجة الماجستير في التصميم والتخطيط العمراني من جامعة عين شمس، حيث يعمل على درجة الدكتوراه. يهتم محمد بدراسة تأثير المساحة العمرانية على المتجمع، متبنياً منهج تركيبي، بناء المساحة، وحالياً زميل في برنامج كارنيجي بالجامعة الأمريكية في واشنطن.

 

 

The following is an excerpt from Abdelbaseer Mohamed’s “Cairo’s Metropolitan Landscape: Segregation Extreme” article. Follow the link below the text for the full article.

The urban growth patterns of the Cairo metropolitan area reveal a fragmented city of heterogeneous parts. As an urbanist and Cairo native I tend to see the city as a series of small islands isolated from one another by strong physical barriers. Walls, highways, flyovers, military sites, abandoned waterfronts, parking lots and vacant lands all contribute to a city that is characterised by a fundamental lack of cohesion. What is more, there is no public realm that accommodates different communities. Rather, each social group is confined to a separate enclave.

Spatial accessibility map for the urban agglomeration within the Ring RD. Red means integrated and accessible, while blue is segregated.

Spatial accessibility map for the urban agglomeration within the Ring RD. Red means integrated and accessible, while blue is segregated.

A long History of Urban Segregation

Urban segregation has been a continual feature of Cairo’s history. Fatimid Cairo (969) was a walled-city exclusively established for the ruling elite. In the Ottoman period (1517-1798), a Hara, mainly a gated residential quarter, was the basic urban unit of the city. Poor harat were located on the peripheries, while the wealthy bourgeois could be found in the centre. As Egyptian sociologist Nawal al-Messiri puts it, ‘Living in a hara, especially a closed hara, was like living in one’s own kingdom. The area was supervised and no person from the outside could enter’. These dynamics persisted into the Mamluk period, during which emirs would cluster around the outskirts of the city and surround their houses with gardens to segregate themselves from the citizens. More recently, the Khedivial city (1869), which was intended mainly for foreigners and wealthy Egyptians, was erected on vacant land west of the old city (although it eventually came to house the working class). By studying the city’s long history it becomes clear that Cairo is like a cracked vase, where fractures over many centuries have been etched into its physical memory. A cursory look at the more recent history of Cairo reveals that these fractures have persisted into the modern day.

Click here for the full article: http://www.failedarchitecture.com/cairos-metropolitan-landscape-segregation-extreme/

Abdelbaseer A. Mohamed is an architect and urban planner. Mohamed received his MSc in Urban planning and Design from Ain Shams University, where he is currently working on his PhD. He is mainly interested in studying the influence of urban space on society adopting a configurational approach, space syntax. Mohamed is currently a Carnegie fellow at American University in Washington.

Translation credit: Radwa Yassin is a fresh Building Engineering graduate from Ain Shams University. Yassin is specialized in Environmental and Sustainable Design, and is currently working as a Business development and Proposals Engineer. She is mainly interested in integrated solutions for planning and designing cities and buildings.

رضوى ياسين مهندسة بناء حديثة التخرج من جامعة عين شمس، متخصصة في التصميم البيئي المستدام، وتعمل حالياً كمهندسة عطاءات وتنمية أعمال. تهتم ياسين بدراسة الحلول المتكاملة لتخطيط وتصميم المدن والمباني.

17 December 2015 / marouhhussein

A “New” Capital – Now in Arabic!

[Note: Complete text in English below]

لال سبع سنوات، ستصبح هناك قاهرة جديدة “جديدة”، إنها العاصمة الجديدة التي سوف يتم بناءها في صحراء مصر الشرقية لتحوي مساكن، وظائف، متنزهات، مساجد وكنائس وجديدة. كل شئ جديد. قد تبدو هذة الفكرة غريبة للكثير من الناس، ولكن ليس للمصريين، فقد تبدلت العاصمة المصرية 24 مرة عبر ال5,000 سنة الماضية، حيث كان كل تبديل منهم بقصد تقليل الكثافة السكانية المركزية وتجنب الازدحام، وعلى الرغم من تكرر حدوث هذة المشاكل مراراً وتكراراً، إلا أن اقتراح الحل نفسه مازال مستمراً.

أعلنت الحكومة المصرية في مارس 2015 عن عقد شراكة مع شركة إماراتية لتمويل إنشاء العاصمة الجديدة، وطبقاً للحكومة المصرية، فإن الهدف الأساسي لهذة المدينة هو تخفيف الإزدحام و “التكدس السكاني” في القاهرة خلال الأربعين سنة القادمة، وسوف تقوم هذة المدينة الجديدة بخلق 21 منطقة سكنية جديدة والتي ستوفر مساكن ل5 مليون شخصاً، وتحتوي هذة المدينة أيضاً على 650 مستشفى وعيادة خارجية،و 1250 مسجد وكنيسة وفندق ومركز تسوق، ومدينة ملاهي ضعف حجم ديزني لاند.

قد لا يدرك العديد مساوئ هذة الفكرة فور قراءتها، فما الضرر في بناء مدينة جديدة وتعمير الأرض الصحراوية؟ ما الضرر في تخفيف زحام العاصمة الحالية وتوزيع الكثافة السكانية للقاهرة؟ وما الضرر في إحتمالية خلق المزيد من فرص العمل لمواطنين الطبقات الشعبية والمتوسطة؟ أما الضرر الحقيقي، فهو غير-واقعية هذة الخطة، الضرر هو قيام شركة خاصة أجنبية ب”شراء” والسيطرة على أراضي مصرية، الضرر هو أن صراع المواطنين المصريين من الطبقات الشعبية والمتوسطة اليومي لعيش حياتهم سيظل مستمراً.

للقاهرة تاريخ حافل بمخططات تشييد مدن بالضواحي في محاولات لتخفيف التكدس السكاني، وفي معظم الأحيان تترك هذة المدن قبل اكتمالها وتهجر، و واقعياً في حال بنيت هذة المدينة بنجاح، فإنها ستصبح مدينة للطبقات العليا بشكل حصري، فالطبقات الشعبية وحتى المتوسطة لن تتحمل تكاليف العيش في هذة المدينة الفاخرة. نعم، تستطيع هذة المدينة بالفعل جذب السياح والمواطنين الأثرياء، ولكن ما هدفها الحقيقي إذا بقيت المشاكل نفسها في القاهرة “القديمة”؟ ما الغرض من إنشاء مدينة جديدة تتجاهل مشاكل مصر العمرانية وتمكن دائرة الفقر من البقاء؟

لم تعد أسعار الوحدات السكنية في مصر في متناول المواطن العادي، مما تسبب في تحول مناطق محدودي الدخل إلي تجويفات مركزية للفقر، فمن أجل تخفيف الإزدحام و”التكدس السكاني” في مدن مثل القاهرة، يجب على الحكومة أن تتوسع خارج نطاق المدينة وذلك عن طريق بناء مساكن إضافية كامتداد للمدينة الموجودة بالفعل، لا أن تقوم ببناء مركز إضافي منزعل، كما عليها أن تقوم بتلبية احتياجات المدن القائمة فعلياً.

إن بناء أي مدينة جديدة يجب أن يتمحور حول رفع اقتصاد البلد ومحاربة الفقر بدلاً من بناء مدينة جديدة للمباني الحكومية وخلق منطقة جذابة للسائحين، وعلى الحكومة المصرية أن تقوم بتعيين مهندسين محليين وشركات مصرية لتخطيط وبناء هذة المدينة بدلاً من إسناد المشروع لشركات أجنبية، فتحويل هذة المدينة الجديدة إلي مشروع محلي سيتيح فرص عمل للمواطنين كما سيساعد على التخفيف من حدة البطالة والفقر. بالإضافة إلي ذلك، تستطيع هذة المدينة الإسهام في زيادة الدخل القومي عن طريق تمكين المواطنين من البدء في الأعمال الصغيرة، وشراء الأراضي والشقق السكنية، وكسب أجور المعيشة. إن حلم بناء المدينة الجديدة واسترجاع مكانة مصر في العالم الخارجي لا يزال ممكناً، ولكن أولاً، يجب أن يقوم على إشراك عموم الشعب في بناء بلد أفضل لهم.

تخرجت سارة البري حديثاً من جامعة روتجرز، وهي حاصلة على درجة البكالوريوس في دراسات التخطيط والسياسة العامة ودراسات الشرق الأوسط، ومرشحة للحصول على درجة الماجستير في الإدارة العامة من جامعة روتجرز في التنمية الدولية والإقليمية.

 

In seven years, there will be a ‘new’ new Cairo. The new capital will be built in Egypt’s Eastern desert with new homes, new jobs, new parks, new mosques and churches, new everything. This may sound like a new idea to many people but not to Egyptians. Over the last 5,000 years, Egypt has had 24 capital city changes. Each move has intended to decrease the population in one area and avoid congestion. Despite these same problems occurring again and again, the same solution continues to be given.

Model of Egypt's new capital. Source: The Guardian

Model of Egypt’s new capital. Source: The Guardian

In March 2015, the Egyptian government announced a partnership with a UAE based company to fund the creation of the new capital city. According to the Egyptian government, the purpose of this new city is to ease congestion and “overpopulation” in Cairo over the next 40 years. The new city will create 21 new residential districts that will house 5 million people. The city will also have over 650 hospitals and clinics, 1,250 mosques and churches, hotels, malls and a theme park double the size of Disneyland.

Many people may read this idea and not immediately realize its faults. What’s wrong with building a new city and urbanizing desert land? What’s wrong with decongesting the current capital and spreading out Cairo’s population? What’s wrong with potentially creating more jobs for the lower and middle class citizens? What is wrong is, the plan is unrealistic. What is wrong is, a non-Egyptian private company is ‘buying’ and controlling Egyptian land. What is wrong is, lower and middle class Egyptian citizens will still struggle to live their daily lives.

capital 2

The new capital will be located in Egypt’s Eastern Desert. Source: The Capital Cairo

Cairo has a long history of creating satellite cities in an effort to decongest Cairo. The cities are often left unfinished and deserted. Realistically, if this city is successfully accomplished, it will become an upper class city that is closed off from others. Lower and even middle class citizens will still not be able to afford to live in such a luxurious city. Yes, it may attract tourists and wealthy residents, but what’s the purpose if the same problems remain in “old” Cairo? What’s the purpose of creating a new city that will neglect Egypt’s urban problems and enable the poverty cycle to continue?

Housing prices are no longer affordable for an average citizen living in Egypt and this has caused low-income areas to become pockets of centralized poverty. In order to ease congestion and “overpopulation” in cities like Cairo, the government needs to expand out of the cities by adding housing as an extension to an already existing city, not creating an additional isolated hub. They also need to address the needs of already existing cities.

capital3

The city is designed to be a cultural and economic hub. Source: The Capital Cairo

Instead of building a new city for government buildings and creating an attractive city for tourists, any new city should be focused on elevating the country’s economy and decreasing poverty. The government in Egypt should hire local engineers and Egyptian companies to plan and build the city instead of contracting out to foreign companies. Making the new city a local project will provide jobs to Egyptian citizens and aid to alleviate unemployment and poverty. In addition, more revenue can be generated when cities provide local opportunities to start businesses, buy land and apartments and earn living wages. The dream of making the new city and restoring Egypt’s reputation to the outside world can still happen, but it should involve Egyptians improving their own country, first.

Sarah Elbery is a recent graduate of Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Planning & Public Policy and Middle Eastern Studies. She is currently an MPA candidate at Rutgers University with a concentration in International and Regional Development. 

Translation credit: Radwa Yassin is a fresh Building Engineering graduate from Ain Shams University. Yassin is specialized in Environmental and Sustainable Design, and is currently working as a Business development and Proposals Engineer. She is mainly interested in integrated solutions for planning and designing cities and buildings.

رضوى ياسين مهندسة بناء حديثة التخرج من جامعة عين شمس، متخصصة في التصميم البيئي المستدام، وتعمل حالياً كمهندسة عطاءات وتنمية أعمال. تهتم ياسين بدراسة الحلول المتكاملة لتخطيط وتصميم المدن والمباني.

10 December 2015 / marouhhussein

The State of Solar in Egypt – Now in Arabic!

[Note: Complete text in English below]

عندما تأتي السابعة صباحاً، يقوم أكثر من 3000 رجل وآمرأة، تماماً مثل إنجي حسين وماريز دوس، بالخروج مسرعين من مساكنهم للركض فوق أسطح القاهرة الخرسانية، فهم يستيقظون مبكراً لكي يتجنبوا الإثنا وعشرون مليون قاهري،ومركباتهم الأربعة ملايين برحلاتها التي تستغرق حدود الساعة، والسحابة السوداء الخبيثة المشبعة بالضباب الدخاني الكيميائي المسرطن الذي يخيم على المدينة كل خريف. فيركضون هرباً من جنون القاهرة، العاصمة التي قاربت على تاريخ إنتهاء صلاحيتها، حيث التوسع العمراني المفرط الذي أودع نحو 20 إلي 40 في المئة من القاهرة الكبرى إلى الخبز الأبيض الرخيص ومواسير الصرف الصحي المكسورة. ولكن التفت لأعلى! إنها الشمس، تلك الكرة الفلكية التي تلفح ريف مصر وتوَّلِد رياح الخماسين المخيفة، قد اتت لإنقاد القاهرة.

في أبريل 2014، تعهدت الحكومة المصرية بمليار دولار أمريكي لتنمية عدة مشاريع طاقة شمسية في أنحاء البلاد، هذا التعهد الذي جاء بعد شهرين من إعلان وزير الكهرباء السابق أحمد إمام عن خطة الحكومة لزيادة حصة الطاقة المتجددة إلي 20 في المئة بحلول عام 2020، إلي جانب تعريفة التغذية بالطاقة السخية التي أعلن عنها في سبتمبر، تعتزم مصر الحصول على 4,300 ميجا وات من الطاقة المتجددة، فإذا صارت الأمور كما الخطة، ستلحق مصر بالعديد من البلدان الأخرى كالولايات المتحدة،و السويد، وفرنسا على طريق توفير الطاقة المتجددة.

وبعد ستة أشهر، اتفقت الحكومة المصرية على التعاون مع SkyPower Global وتنمية الخليج الدولية (IGD) لاستثمار 5 مليار دولار لتوليد 3000 ميجا وات من مشاريع الطاقة الشمسية، يهدف المشروع إلي خلق 75 ألف فرصة عمل وتقليل النسبة المؤية للبطالة 13.4 في البلاد، تم توقيع عقد الشراكة في مؤتمر دعم وتنمية الإقتصاد المصري المنعقد بشرم الشيخ في مارس 2015 بحضور مفوضين لتمثيل اكثر من 112 دولة، حيث لعبت مصر بكروتها لجذب استثمارات أجنبية بقرابة 60 مليار دولار، فقد أعلن وزير الاستثمار المصري، أشرف سلمان، في اليوم الثالث للمؤتمر أن الحكومة قد حصلت على اتفاقات موقعة ب 38.2 مليار دولار، ومع ختام المؤتمر حصلت الحكومة على مذكرات تفاهم تصل إلي 92 مليار دولار، خصصت منها 24 في المئة لقطاع إنتاج الكهرباء والطاقة. يعتبر مؤتمر دعم وتنمية الاقتصاد المصري جزء من خطة اكبر أصدرتها الجمعية المصرية لصناعات الطاقة الشمسية (SIA-EGYPT) في مارس بعنوان “السوق المصري للطاقة الشمسية تعريفة التغذية بالطاقة – ما بعد 2015″، مما دفع اكثر من 174 شركة بما فيهم Masdar و SkyPower Global و ACWA Power و Terra Solarإلي الانطلاق مسرعين كالذباب المتلهف للحصول على وعود الحكومة المصرية المعسولة بوعود تعريفة التغذية بالطاقة وعقود التطوير المستقل (IPP)، هذا وقد اقتصرت سلسلة المشاريع الأولى على انتاج 20 ميجا وات، مما يعادل تقريباً عُشر ال2,300 ميجا وات التي تعتزم الحكومة توليدها من الطاقة الشمسية بحلول عام 2017، بينما اتجه عدد قليل من هذة الاستثمارات إلي مشروعات ذات نطاق أكبر في قطاعات الأشغال العامة ومزارع الطاقة الشمسية الضوئية العملاقة المتصلة بشبكات القاهرة الكهربائية، على سبيل المثال مشروع Solar Park لشركة Terra Solar لانتاج 800 ميجا وات، وتساهم مشروعات أخرى بمصفوفات طاقة شمسية أصغر حجماً، والبحوث التقنية والتصنيع والتدريب.

ومن ناحية أخرى، فضلت بعض الهيئات أن تعمل خارج إطار برنامج الجمعية المصرية لصناعات الطاقة الشمسية (SIA-EGYPT) لتعريفة التغذية بالطاقة، على سبيل المثال مشروع “مدن الطاقة الشمسية – Solar Cities” لتركيب سخانات شمسية للمياة في حية منشأة ناصر، كما يعتزم كلاً من البنك الأهلي المصري وبنك مصر تمويل أنظمة الطاقة الشمسية فوق الأسطح من خلال تقديم قروض بأسعار فائدة تترواح بين 4 إلى 8 في المئة، إن وحدات الطاقة الشمسية فوق الأسطح سوف تساهم في تخفيف الحمل على شبكات الكهرباء المنهكة التي باتت تعتمد بشكل متزايد على الغاز الطبيعي، ونجد أكثر المتضررين بفشل هذة الشبكات بشكل ملموس في الأحياء الفقيرة وعشوائيات القاهرة الكبرى، إن احتراق الغاز الطبيعي لتعزيز هذة الشبكات قد عكر أجواء القاهرة بهواء ملوث يقدره بعض الخبراء بما يعادل تدخين علبة سجائر يوماً.

تستطيع علاقة مصر الوليدة بالطاقة الشمسية أن تخرج البلاد من دائرة الاعتماد على مصادر الطاقة غير المتجددة المسببة للتلوث، فضلاً عن إثارة اهتمام دول اخرى بمنطقة الشرق الأوسط وبشكل خاص دول الخليج، ففي حال نجحت، قد تقود مصر نوع جديد من التمثيل الضوئي، حيث تستقبل البلاد ضوء الشمس المجمع في وديان من وحدات الطاقة الشمسية، وبدورها تتفتح أحياءها الفقيرة كزهور اللوتس.

ماريا راموس كاتبة حرة تعيش حالياً في شيكاجو، حصلت على درجة بكالوريوس الآداب في اللغة الإنجليزية من جامعة إلينوي بشيكاجو، ودرست الإتصالات كتخصص ثانوي، تدوَِن ماريا عن نصائح صديقة للبيئة، وإنجازات تكنولوجية، وأنماط الحياة الصحية النشيطة.

 

Come 7:00 A.M., more than 3,000 men and women like, Engi Hassaan and Mariz Doss, will tumble out of their apartments to jog atop the concrete of Cairo. They rise early to dodge the city’s 22 million residents, the four million automobiles and their one-hour commutes, and the insidious “black cloud” of carcinogenic smog that hangs over the city every autumn. They run to escape the craziness of Cairo, a capital city nearing its expiration date, where hyper-urbanization has consigned some 20 to 40 percent of Greater Cairo to cheap white bread and broken sewer pipes. But look up! The sun, that orb that bakes rural Egypt and generates the fearsome khamaseen wind, has come to save Cairo.

Imagine if the satellites that cover Cairo's rooftops were replaced with solar. Source: Wikicommons

Imagine if the satellites that cover Cairo’s rooftops were replaced with solar. Source: Wikicommons

In April 2014, the Egyptian government pledged $1 billion USD to develop several nationwide solar power projects. The vow came just two months after former electricity minister Ahmed Emam announced that the country planned to increase its share of renewable energy to 20 percent by 2020. Along with a generous feed-in tariff announced in September, Egypt intends to procure 4,300 megawatts of renewable energy. If all goes as planned, Egypt will be following many other countries, such as the United States, Sweden and France, on the road to making renewable energy more available.

Six months later, the government of Egypt shook hands with SkyPower Global and International Gulf Development for a $5 billion investment to create 3,000 megawatts of utility-scale solar projects. The project aims to create 75,000 jobs and put a dent in the country’s 13.4 percent unemployment rate. The partnership was signed at the Economic Development Conference held at Egypt’s Sharm el-Sheikh resort in March 2015. Delegates representing more than 112 countries attended the conference, where Egypt played its cards to attract some $60 billion in foreign investment. By the third day of the conference, Egypt’s Minister of Investment, Ashraf Salman, could boast that the country had procured $38.2 billion in signed agreements. By the conclusion, Egypt had raked in $92 billion in Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs). About 24 percent of that went to the electricity and power generation sector. Egypt’s Economic Development Conference was part of a greater plan released by the Egypt Solar Industry Association (Egypt-SIA) in March 2015 titled, ” Egypt’s Solar Energy Market – FiT Program and Beyond 2015.” Masdar, SkyPower Global, ACWA Power, Terra Sola and 174 more, flew like eager flies to Egypt’s honey-dripping promises of feed-in tariffs and

A solar panel in Marla, Cirque de Mafate, Réunion. Source: Wikicommons

A solar panel in Marla, Cirque de Mafate, Réunion. Source: Wikicommons

merchant IPP schemes. The first round of accepted projects will generate 20 megawatts, almost one-tenth of the 2,300 megawatts of solar power that Egypt hopes to develop by 2017. A few of the investments are large-scale public works projects and giant photovoltaic solar farms connected to Cairo’s electrical grid, such as Terra Solar’s 800-megawatt “solar park.” Other projects will contribute through smaller solar arrays, technical research, manufacturing and training.

Some organizations, however, have chosen to work outside of Egypt-SIA’s FiT program. A grassroots example is Solar Cities, which installs solar hot water heaters in the neighborhood of Manshiet Nasr. Additionally, The National Bank of Egypt and Banque Misr both plan to finance rooftop solar systems by providing loans with 4-8 percent interest rates. Rooftop solar units will help wean the country off its overworked grid that has become increasingly dependent on natural gas. The failure of that grid is felt the worst in the slums of Greater Cairo. The natural gas burned to sustain that grid has dirtied the Cairo atmosphere with air pollution that some experts liken to smoking a pack of cigarettes daily.

Egypt’s budding love affair with solar power could lift the country off its reliance on non-renewable and polluting energy sources, as well as ignite interest in other Middle East countries, particularly the Gulf States. If successful, Egypt could be leading a new type of photosynthesis, where the country basks in sunlight collected by PV parks, and in turn its poor neighborhoods blossom like lotus flowers.

Maria Ramos is a freelance writer currently living in Chicago. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a minor in Communication. She blogs about environmentally friendly tips, technological advancements, and healthy, active lifestyles.

Translation credit: Radwa Yassin is a fresh Building Engineering graduate from Ain Shams University. Yassin is specialized in Environmental and Sustainable Design, and is currently working as a Business development and Proposals Engineer. She is mainly interested in integrated solutions for planning and designing cities and buildings.

رضوى ياسين مهندسة بناء حديثة التخرج من جامعة عين شمس، متخصصة في التصميم البيئي المستدام، وتعمل حالياً كمهندسة عطاءات وتنمية أعمال. تهتم ياسين بدراسة الحلول المتكاملة لتخطيط وتصميم المدن والمباني.

3 December 2015 / marouhhussein

Utilizing Lost Space in Cairo – Now in Arabic!

[Note: Complete text in English below]

تحتوي القاهرة على ما يقرب من 70 كوبري علوي تم بناءهم لتخفيف المشكلة المرورية المزمنة لدى المدينة، وفي كثير من الأحيان تتحول هذة المنشآت إلى حواجز مادية وفجوات عملاقة تخل باستمرارية الشكل العام للمدينة، أضف إلي ذلك أن غالبية المساحات أسفل هذة الشوارع و الطرق السريعة المرفوعة غير مستغلة، قذرة، مظلمة، قبيحة، غير جذابة، متدهورة ومخيفة، وصارت مساحات مفتوحة تم إهدارها بالتجاهل والإهمال، وأصبحت أيضاً مجرد مساحات بينية أو “مواقع عدمية” تعمل كحد فاصل بين المناطق داخل المدينة. ولكن، ماذا إذا كان باستطاعة هذة المساحات العمل كعناصر تتدمج وتتكامل بدلاً من أن تقسم وتهدر الأراضي؟ ما هي إمكانية أن نقوم بتحويل المساحات السلبية، عديمة الحياة في القاهرة إلي أماكن ممتعة ،آمنة، ومتاحة للجميع؟

تتسم العديد من أحياء القاهرة بنُدرة المرافق والمساحات العامة، فتمثل المساحات اسفل الكباري بالنسبة لهذة الأحياء فرصة ثمينة للمجتمعات المحلية. فعوضاً عن استخدامها لنشاط إجرامي أو كمكبات للقمامة في الهواء الطلق، من الممكن تحويل هذة المساحات الميتة إلي أماكن رائعة للخدمات المجتمعية المختلفة والأنشطة الخارجية كالمكتبات المفتوحة، الفعاليات العامة، المعارض الفنية، والمطاعم ووسائل الترفيه. تستطيع هذة النوعية من المشاريع اللا-مركزية أن تعمل مراكز للترفيه، وأن توفر أماكن جذابة حيث يمكن أن يتفاعل مختلف فئات المجتمع. تخيل نوعاً آخر من القاهرة، مدينة بيئتها العمرانية تعاون المواطنين والمارة على المشاركة في المناسبات الثقافية والاجتماعية.

هناك الكثير من المبادرات العمرانية القائمة هدفها تحسين وتطوير مسطحات القاهرة الخضراء والمسطحات الحضرية، يهدف مشروع “ممرات وسط البلد” لمبادرة Cluster إلي إعادة تصميم ممرات وسط البلد الغير مستغلة بالقدر الكافي، بينما دشنت حملة “تلوين المدينة الرمادية” لإضافة البريق و الألوان لدرج وجدران القاهرة، وفي اعتقادي، ان الوقت قد حان لإطلاق مبادرة “أسفل الكوبري” للاستفادة من المساحات اسفل الكباري.

ويمكننا أن نجد مثال رئيسي على إمكانية استخدام المناطق أسفل الكباري بفاعلية في كراكاس، فنزويلا، حيث تباع الكتب تحت كوبري

Az Fuerzas Armadas، وتحولت المساحة اسفل الكوبري إلي منزه للكثير من الناس، كما توفر مساحة للتسلية بما في ذلك الألعاب العامة كالشطرنج.

مثال بارز آخر قيد التشغيل هو متنزه برنسايد للتزلج Burnside Skatepark في بورتلاد، بولاية أوريجن، في الولايات المتحدة الأمريكية، حيث يقع المتنزه أسفل كوبري برنسايد على الضفة الشرقية لنهر ويلاميت، وبالرغم من أن بناء المتنزه تم بدون تصريح من قبل بعض المتزلجين، إلا أن الفكرة ألهمت العديد بالمدن الأمريكية باتخاذ مبادرات مشابهة. كما نستطيع ان نشاهد المزيد من النماذج الناجحة لمشروعات أسفل الكباري في جميع أنحاء العالم، من تورونتو إلى سلوفاكيا، لندن، ويسكونسن، زانستاد، وغيرهم.

إن تغيير هيئة هذة المناطق المهملة لن يتم بين ليلة وضحاها، فلكي يتم إعادة تصميم هذة المناطق المهدرة بالقاهرة، يجب على الحكومة أولاً أن تقوم بدراسة شاملة لتقييم الاستفادة المحتملة من هذة الأماكن الخارجية المفتوحة، وبشكل خاص الأراضي الخراب أسفل الكباري. فاستصلاح هذة المساحات سوف يضيف آلاف الأمتار المربعة من الأراضي القيمة لصالح مشروعات ثقافية،واقتصادية، واجتماعية. فباستطاعة هذة المساحات الحضرية -إذا صممت بشكل صحيح- أن توفر إطاراً موحداً لاعتراض الشكل المقسم للقاهرة الحديثة. ختاماً، إن شمول سكان الأحياء في عملية التحوييل العمراني لهذة الأماكن المنسية سيصبح المفتاح لخلق مساحات عامة شعبية للسكان المحيطين لينتفعوا منها وتكون تحت رعايتهم.

عبدالبصير محمد معماري ومخطط عمراني، حصل على درجة الماجستير في التصميم والتخطيط العمراني من جامعة عين شمس، حيث يعمل على درجة الدكتوراه. يهتم محمد بدراسة تأثير المساحة العمرانية على المتجمع، متبنياً منهج تركيبي، بناء المساحة، وحالياً زميل في برنامج كارنيجي بالجامعة الأمريكية في واشنطن.

 

There are almost 70 flyovers in Cairo that have been built to alleviate the city’s chronic traffic problem. These structures are often strong physical barriers or giant holes that disrupt the overall continuity of the city’s physical form. Furthermore, most of the spaces under these elevated freeways and roadways are left underused, dirty, dark, ugly, unattractive, deteriorating and frightening. They become wasted outdoor spaces that are ignored and neglected . They also become in-between spaces or ‘non-places’ that divide territories within the city. But what if these spaces could work as unifying and integrating objects, rather than dividing waste land? How can we transform negative spaces, devoid of life, in Cairo into fun, safe places open to all?

Flyover in Cairo. Source: Marwan Abdel Rahman

Flyover in Cairo. Source: Marwan Abdel Rahman

Many neighborhoods in Cairo are characterized by a lack of public amenities and space. For these neighborhoods under-bridge spaces offer a precious opportunity for local communities. Instead of being used for criminal activity or outdoor landfills, these dead spaces can be transformed into fantastic venues for various community facilities and outdoors activities such as pop-up libraries, public events, art galleries, canteens, and recreation. These kinds of anti-territorial projects could work as entertainment hubs and provide an inviting place where different groups of people can interact with one another. Imagine another kind of Cairo, a city whose physical environmental helps locals and passers-by to engage in open for cultural and social functions.

Empty and underused spaces under bridges in Cairo. Source: author

Empty and underused spaces under bridges in Cairo. Source: author

Empty and underused spaces under bridges in Cairo. Source: author

Empty and underused spaces under bridges in Cairo. Source: author

There are many already existing urban initiatives that aim to improve the landscape and townscape of Cairo. Cluster’s Cairo Downtown Passages aims to redesign underused downtown passageways, while the Coloring a Gray City campaign was launched to add brightness and color to Cairo’s staircases and walls. I believe it is time to launch an ‘Under Bridge’ initiative to utilize areas beneath flyovers.

A prime example of the potential for actively using areas under bridges can be seen in Caracas, Venezuela where books are being sold under the Av Fuerzas Armadas flyover. The space under the bridge has become a hangout spot for many people and provides a space for recreation, including public games of chess.

The street chess players under the bridge on Fuerzas Armadas avenue. Source: caracasshots.blogspot.com

The street chess players under the bridge on
Fuerzas Armadas avenue. Source: caracasshots.blogspot.com

The second hand book market under Av Fuerzas Armadas. Source: caracasshots.blogspot.com

The second hand book market under Av Fuerzas Armadas. Source: caracasshots.blogspot.com

Another iconic example of action is Burnside Skate Park in Portland, Oregon, USA. The park is located under the Burnside Bridge on the east side of the Willamette River. Even though the skatepark was built by skaters without permission, the idea has inspired similar action in under bridge areas in many American cities.

More examples of successful under-bridge projects can be seen around the world from Toronto, to Slovakia , London, Wisconsin, Zaanstad and more.

Burnside Skate Park. Source: Rufus Kevin Guy via Flickr

Burnside Skate Park. Source: Rufus Kevin Guy via Flickr

Southbank skate park under Hungerford Bridge, London. Source: www.timeout.com

Southbank skate park under Hungerford Bridge, London. Source: http://www.timeout.com

The transformation of these neglected areas won’t happen overnight. In order to redesign lost spaces in Cairo, the government must first conduct a thorough study of the usability of outdoor spaces, especially the wasteland beneath overpasses. Reclaiming these lost spaces will add thousands of square meters of valuable land for the benefit of cultural, economic and social projects. If designed properly, these urban spaces could provide a unifying framework to challenge the fragmented form of modern Cairo. Lastly, involving local people in the urban transformation process of these forgotten spaces will be key to creating popular public spaces that will be utilized and cared for by the surrounding residents.

Abdelbaseer A. Mohamed is an architect and urban planner. Mohamed received his MSc in Urban planning and Design from Ain Shams University, where he is currently working on his PhD. He is mainly interested in studying the influence of urban space on society adopting a configurational approach, space syntax. Mohamed is currently a Carnegie fellow at American University in Washington.

Translation credit: Radwa Yassin is a fresh Building Engineering graduate from Ain Shams University. Yassin is specialized in Environmental and Sustainable Design, and is currently working as a Business development and Proposals Engineer. She is mainly interested in integrated solutions for planning and designing cities and buildings.

رضوى ياسين مهندسة بناء حديثة التخرج من جامعة عين شمس، متخصصة في التصميم البيئي المستدام، وتعمل حالياً كمهندسة عطاءات وتنمية أعمال. تهتم ياسين بدراسة الحلول المتكاملة لتخطيط وتصميم المدن والمباني.

5 November 2015 / marouhhussein

Al-Mu’izz li-Dîn Allah Street: Where the Past Meets Cairo’s Urban Expansion – Now in Arabic!

شارع المعز لدين الله الفاطمى : حين يلتقى الماضى مع امتداد القاهرة العمرانى

[Note: Complete text in English below]

أثناء السير فى شارع المعز لدين الله فى القاهرة الفاطمية, يلاحظ السائر بعض من أعتق الأثار والقواعد الأساسية فى بناء القاهرة, من ثم أصبح شاهد على كيفية نمو المدينة وامتدادها إلى ما وراء حوائطها الأصلية حتى أصبحت اليوم قطب نمو يحتوى على أكثر من 20 مليون ساكن.

على امتداد الطريق يمر السائر بالأحياء القديمة بأهلها, الأسواق كخان الخليلى أو الأسواق على شارع الموسكى, الأزهر ومسجد الحسين ويصل أخيراً إلى محور تجارى مزدحم وبذلك يصبح فى شارع الأزهر.

السير على طول شارع المعز يعد قصة لتاريخ القاهرة الحاضر حتى الآن على حد سواء مع امتدادها العمرانى الذى لا يكل ولا يهدأ.

شارع المعز لدين الله هو جزء مما يعرف بإسم القاهرة التاريخية, بطريقة ما هى منطقة محددة ومثيرة للجدل بالإضافة إلى انها موقع تراثى عالمى تحت إشراف اليونسكو منذ 1979. قبل حصولها على هذا اللقب, المبانى والأثار فى تلك المنطقة كانت إما تحصل على إنتباه واهتمام قوى من الدولة أو يتم درجها فى المخططات العمرانية بدون خطط واضحة للحفاظ عليها, حمايتها أو إعادة تأهيلها. وقد أدى ذلك إلى خليط من المبانى المتهالكة منذ قرن من الزمان, إلى جانب المبانى المرتجلة والغير رسمية التى تركن بطريقة خطرة على بعضها البعض, وبقايا مبانى مهدمة فى الطرق الخلفية.

بعيداً عن كونها موقع تراث عالمى, بالتالى تقع تحت معايير حماية محددة, القاهرة التاريخية, تحديداً على طول شارع المعز, أصبحت هدف لعديد من المشروعات.

المقترح الأخير كان لتحويل شارع المعز إلى متحف مفتوح, فى مجهودات لإحياء القطاع الإقتصادى الرئيسى لمصر, السياحة.

مع تلك المقومات الضخمة, فإن الأعمال التى تمت على مدار السنين قد أثمرت فى تجميل الشارع  والمجال المحيط به, بما فى ذلك إضافة طبقة لمعان جديدة للمبانى.

مع ذلك لم تأخذ أيا من تلك التحركات فى اعتبارها المكون الإجتماعى الذى يحافظ على بقاء وحيوية ذلك المكان.

المبانى ذات القيمة العالية وجزء من التراث الثقافى لذلك المكان يبدو وكأنه قد تم نسيانه, إلى الأن على الأقل, وقد أثير الشك حول ما إذا كانت تقنيات التجديد تراعى الأسس التى تعطى قيمة لتلك الأثار.

إذا أصبحت تلك المنطقة متحف مفتوح, فإن أى سائر, ما إذا كان سائح أو محلياً, متجولاً فى الطريق من نهاية إلى آخرى – باب الفتوح إلى باب زويلة – سوف يرى فقط ما قُدم لتتم رؤيته وسوف يشهد فقط تمثيل صغير لمنطقة قيمة تمتد إلى أبعد وأكثر من مجرد شارع واحد.

بالإضافة إلى أن مشروع المتحف المفتوح ومشروعات آخرى تركيزها الأساسى على المبانى, مع العمارة التاريخية للمنطقة, وبالتالى خلق فجوة هامة ما بين الأشخاص وتلك المنطقة.

بمساعدة المنظمات الدولية مثل هيئة المعونة الأمريكية, الأمم المتحدة ومؤسسة أغا خان الثقافية.

المنظمات المحلية مثل مجاورة والرُبع, قد تفاعلت مع السكان المحليين والتجار الذين أعطوا الحياة لذلك الشارع وللأحياء المجاورة.

هؤلاء الأشخاص ساهموا فى خلق طابع خاص للمكان بطريقة يومية وحيوية, من خلال أعمالهم, مهاراتهم, وحرفهم الفنية واليدوية, وبقصص وروابط الأسر, كما يمكن أن يرى من خلال رويات نجيب محفوظ على سبيل المثال.

أى إعادة تأهيل للمبانى على طول المعز وفى القاهرة التاريخية بحاجة إلى أن تأخذ فى الاعتبار الديناميكية اليومية لمثل تلك الأحياء الشعبية.

الفصل المتكرر لتلك القضايا يطرح سؤال عن الغرض من الحفاظ على تلك المنطقة كموقع تراث عالمى ومتحف مفتوح: هل ذلك الفراغ متاح ليتم عرضه وتحويله إلى متحف مفتوح, ولمن؟

السؤال الأكثر أهمية, رغبات من التى تخدمها تلك المشروعات؟

العلاقة ما بين السياح, التجار والسكان لابد من مراعتها, حيث يمكن تشكيل التاريخ بمختلف الخطابات ,سواء أن كانت شخصية, محلية أو عالمية.

هل يمكن القول أن باكتساب ذلك المكان لصفة التراث العالمى فإن لنا جميعاً ماضى مشترك , بإعتباره عالمى ؟

عندما يتم عرض الماضى من خلال خطاب معين, فإن ذلك يمكن أن يتلاعب بهوية المكان, والمحيط به, والتأثير ببطئ على الذكريات التى كان قد تم تصورها وتخيلها عن تاريخ شارع المعز.

هنا يكون الرابط ما بين الماضى, الهوية, وحكاية مكان لا بد من الحفاظ عليه بجانب أهله ودينامكياته وأسسه الثقافية.

الأخطر من أي طريق أخر هو أن يكون هناك انفصال متزايد ما بين الخطاب الرسمي والواقع داخل هذه الأحياء.

أصبح شارع المعز أيضاً منطقة يتمكن ساكنيها والمارين بها من الاختلاط معاً وإعادة توظيف المساحة العامة لتتوافق معهم بطريقتهم الخاصة. وبالتالى خلق مكان للمقابلات والإجتماعيات.

لا يزال فى محض الرؤية, إلى أى مدى ونتائج سيصل ذلك, حيث أن المشروعات قد اقتطعت وتم احيائها مرة أخرى إلى جانب الديناميكيات الإجتماعية لذلك المكان وللقاهرة الكبرى.

عند استخدام الماضى بجعله غير متحرك ومع ذلك متحرك بصورة كافية للتدخل والتغيير فى مخططات التنمية العمرانية للقاهرة, لابد من عدم نسيان الطبقات المتعددة – إجتماعيا, اقتصادياً, ثقافيا – والتى تشكل وتستمر فى جلب الحياة لشارع المعز وجعله مستحق للزيارة.

كتاب “الشارع العظيم, المعز لدين الله, القاهرة التاريخية” , من الحكومة المصرية ومهدى إلى فاروق حسنى, الوزير السابق للثقافة, من أجل تفاصيلى عن المشروع.

ليندا بيترهان ولدت ونشأت فى سويسرا, اهتمامها بالشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا بدأ عندما بدأت فى دراسة اللغة العربية كطالبة واستمر فى النمو بعد ذلك عند قضائها سنة فى الأردن.

ليندا أكملت طريقها فى علم الإجتماع والإجتماعيات مع التركيز على نطاق الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا.

دراستها أتت بها إلى القاهرة, مصر حيث بدأت فى العمل على رسالتها.

صعقت بجمال مناظرها الطبيعية وتعقيداتها, أخذت ليندا اهتمام متزايد فى الدراسات العمرانية ودمجتها مع أخر عمل لها فى الماجيستير. تركز الأن على دمج الدراسات العمرانية مع العلاقات الإنسانية فى الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا.

 

 

 

Al-Mu’izz li-Dîn Allah Street with renovated monuments; not all of monuments are open for visits – photo: LP

Al-Mu’izz li-Dîn Allah Street with renovated monuments; not all of monuments are open for visits – photo: LP

When walking down Al-Mu’izz li-Dîn Allah Street in Fatimid Cairo, one observes some of the most ancient monuments and foundations of Cairo, thus becoming a witness to how the city has developed and extended beyond its original walls to a megapole of more than 20 million inhabitants today. Along the way one passes old neighborhoods with their people, markets such as the Khân al-Khalili or ones along Muski street, Al-Azhar and Al-Hussein mosque, and finally comes to a busy commercial axis that has become Al-Azhar street. The walk along Al-Mu’izz li-Dîn Allah Street is both a story of Cairo’s ever-present past and its restless urban expansion.

Al-Mu’izz li-Dîn Allah Street is part of what is known as Historic Cairo, a somewhat debatable delimited area and a World Heritage Site under UNESCO since 1979. Before receiving this recognition, the buildings and monuments in this area had either not received great attention from the government or had been included in urban plans without a clear agenda for preservation, protection, or rehabilitation. This has led to a patchwork of century-old run-down buildings, along with improvised or informal buildings leaning dangerously against one another, and remnants of demolished buildings in the backstreets.

One can see a minaret and a mosque whose roof is damaged and disappears between the neighboring buildings. The contrast is obvious between the more “glamorous” parts of Al-Mu’izz street and its second half, which is cut by Al-Azhar street. All of this area is protected area under World Heritage Site regulations. Photo: LP

One can see a minaret and a mosque whose roof is damaged and disappears between the neighboring buildings. The contrast is obvious between the more “glamorous” parts of Al-Mu’izz street and its second half, which is cut by Al-Azhar street. All of this area is protected area under World Heritage Site regulations. Photo: LP

Despite being a World Heritage Site, thus being under specific protective regulations, Historic Cairo, specifically along Al-Mu’izz street, has been the target of several projects. The latest proposal is to make Al-Muizz street an open-air museum [1], in an effort to restore Egypt’s main economic sector, tourism. With such huge potential, actions taken over the past years have resulted in the beautification of the street and its space, including adding a new gloss to the buildings. Yet none of these actions have taken into account the social component of what keeps this place alive. Valuable buildings and part of this space’s cultural heritage seem nevertheless to have been forgotten, for now at least, and doubts have been raised about whether renovation techniques are respecting the structure and other elements that give value to these monuments. If this area becomes an open-air museum, then any walker, whether a tourist or a local, wandering down the street from one end to the other – Bab al-Futuh to Bab Zuwayla – would only see what is put forth to be seen and would only witness a small representation of a valuable area that stretches beyond one street.

peterhans2Moreover, the open-air museum project and others have mainly focused on the buildings, emphasizing the historical architecture of this area, thus creating an important gap between the people and this space. With the help of international organizations such as USAID, UNESCO and The Aga Khan Trust for Culture, local organizations such as Megawra and Al-Rab3,  have engaged with the civilian population and merchants who give life to this street and surrounding neighborhoods. These people contribute to the place’s character in a daily and lively manner, through their work, skills and art crafts, and family stories and ties, as can be seen through Naguib Mahfouz’s novels for instance.

Any rehabilitation of the buildings along Al-Mu’izz and in Historic Cairo needs to take into account the daily dynamics of this popular neighborhood. The frequent dismissal of these issues raises questions about what is intended by preserving this area as a World Heritage Site and an open-air museum: does this space exist  to be displayed and turned into a museum, and for whom? More importantly, whose interests do these projects serve? The relationship between tourists, merchants, and inhabitants has to be carefully considered, as the past can be shaped through various discourses, be it personal, national, or universal.  Could one even say that the world heritage status this place has acquired means that we all have a common past, since it is universal?

When the past is being displayed and modeled through a certain discourse, it can alter a place’s identity, its surroundings and, slowly, affect the memories that have been created and perceived about Al-Mu’izz street’s past. This is where the link between the past, identity, and story of a place needs to be maintained along with its people and their dynamics and cultural foundations. The danger of any other path would be a growing disconnect between an official discourse and the reality within these neighborhoods.

Al-Mu’izz street is a vibrant commercial space within a historical setting. Fences that protect the walls of classified monuments, have been incorporated into daily activities. The question lies therefore on where the accent is put: the historical aspect, its market or both? Photo: LP

Al-Mu’izz street is a vibrant commercial space within a historical setting. Fences that protect the walls of classified monuments, have been incorporated into daily activities. The question lies therefore on where the accent is put: the historical aspect, its market or both? Photo: LP

Al-Muizz street has also become a place where inhabitants and passers-by now mingle together and re-appropriate the public space on their own, thus creating a place to be seen and socialize. To what extent and results this will lead to is yet to be seen, as projects have been interrupted and timidly started again, along with the changing social dynamics of this place and broader Cairo. When using the past by making it immobile and yet mobile enough to integrate within Cairo’s urban development plans, one must not forget about the multiple layers – social, economic, cultural – that actually shape and continue to bring life to Al-Mu’izz street and make it worthwhile to visit.

[1] See the book “The Great Street, Al-Mu’izz Li-Din Illah, Historic Cairo”, from the Egyptian government and a foreword by Farouk Hosni, former Minister of Culture for my details on the project.

Linda Peterhans was born and raised in Switzerland. Her interest in the Middle-East and North Africa (MENA) began when she started to study Arabic as an undergraduate student and then further developed when she spent a year in Jordan. Linda continued her academic path in anthropology and sociology while focusing on the MENA region. Her studies brought her to Cairo, Egypt where she began to work on her thesis. Struck by the beauty of the landscape and its complexities, Linda took a growing interest in urban studies and therefore combined it into her final master work. She is now focusing on incorporating urban studies into humanitarian affairs in the MENA region.

Arabic translation by Samaa Abd El-Shakour, Senior Urban Planning student at Cairo University, specializing in urban anthropology and the enhancement of the quality of life in Informal areas using local resources. 

7 October 2015 / marouhhussein

Solar Cities: A Greener Cairo – Now in Arabic!

المدن الشمسية: إلى قاهرة أكثر اخضراراً

[Note: Complete text in English below]

بما يقارب ال20 مليون مواطن بها, القاهرة, قد تبدو وأنها تفتقر إلى أى جانب من جوانب المدن الخضراء. ولكن لهؤلاء من ينظرون عن كثب, البراعم الخضراء للتنمية المستدامة متواجدة فى كل مكان.

فى الواقع, المعيشة فى المناطق الحضرية الأكثر كثافة هو غالباً من أفضل ما يمكن أن يقوم به الأشخاص من أجل عالم أكثر استدامة ولتطوير أنفسهم اقتصادياً. حتى الآن تلك المجهودات تطرح دروسا عن تحديات وفرص جعل القاهرة مدينة أكثر اخضراراً.

ازدحام وصخب الحياة اليومية, بالجانب إلى مستويات مرتفعة من الفقر المدقع, غالبا ما يثبط الأشخاص عن التفكير الأخضر واتخاذ مبادرات ايجابية, حيث أنهم غالبا ما يصارعون فقط من أجل البقاء.

طبقا لمركز التعبئة العامة والإحصاء, فإن الفقر على مستوى مصر يصل إلى 26.3% وفى ازدياد مستمر. نتيجة لمستويات الفقر الغير عادية فى جميع أنحاء مصر, العديد من الأشخاص تم إجبارهم على ايجاد طرق من أجل المعيشة بوسائل أسرع وغير مكلفة ,عادة على حساب الصحة والظروف البيئية على المدى البعيد.

مثال على ذلك يمكن العثور عليه فى حى منشأة ناصر بالقاهرة. سكانها الأصليين المعروفين بإسم “الزبالين” (جامعي القمامة) لديهم كجزء من استراتيجيتهم فى تنظيم المشاريع ودمجها في حيهم, مجموعة متنوعة من أنواع مختلفة من السماد, مواد إعادة التدوير, القمامة, وما إلى ذلك من أجل كسب لقمة العيش.

العناصر يتم تجميعها من جميع أنحاء القاهرة ويتم استخدامها فى ابتكار اختراعات فريدة من نوعها فى منازلهم والتى بإمكانهم بيعها أو حرقها من أجل الغاز حيث أن الحى غير متصل بشبكة غاز القاهرة.

بينما أن ذلك كان لديه تداعيات صحية وبيئية واضحة, فلا بد من الإشارة إلى أن دراسات عديدة قد أظهرت أن ذلك النظام هو أحد أكثر الأنظمة الفعالة وأدناهم فى المخلفات على مستوى العالم.

على الرغم من الصحة القاتمة والأحوال المعيشية بمنشأة ناصر, احد المنظمات, المدن الشمسية, تعمل على تحسين الأحوال المعيشية. فى 2012 إحد السكان الأصليين بمنشأة ناصر, هناء فتحى, عملت مع شريكها والخبير الإقتصادى توماس كولهان, لتوفير سخانات شمسية لسكان الحى. أنظمة التسخين الشمسية تستخدم الطاقة المُجمعة من الشمس لإنتاج حرارة ومياه ساخنة لإستخدامها فى الأغراض السكنية والتجارية والصناعية. أنظمة التسخين الشمسية غالبا ما تتواجد فى المناطق الحضارية والشبه حضارية المُنماة ولكن من الصعب ايجادها أيضاً فى مناطق مثل منشأة ناصر والمناطق الحضرية الآخرى الفقيرة والمُهملة.

بدءا بنظام تسخين واحد, سعت المدن الشمسية للحصول على التمويل ل13 سخان شمسى فى جميع أنحاء منشأة ناصر والدرب الأحمر ومناطق أخرى فقيرة داخل القاهرة.

لسوء الحظ, فإن على الرغم من جدارة عمل المدن الشمسية, إلا أن التسخين الشمسى لم يكتسب العديد من المؤيدين فى مناطق أخرى فقيرة للعديد من الأسباب.

السبب الأول والأكثر شيوعاً هو بسبب التكلفة المبدئية. فمتوسط تكلفة النظام الواحد 3500 جنيه مصرى (650 دولار آمريكى). للأغلبية العظمى من سكان القاهرة, فإن تلك التكلفة مرتفعة وغير معقولة تماما. أسباب أخرى تتعلق بالخوف من التغيير والمفاهيم الخاظئة فى الأثار الناتجة عن حصولهم على سخان شمسى داخل المنزل. نتيجة لندرة السخانات الشمسية داخل مناطق القاهرة الفقيرة, فالعديد من الأشخاص يتخوفون من أن استخدام الطاقة الشمسية للتسخين قد يسبب أمراض ونتائج أخرى سلبية لساكنين المنزل. العديد من سكان منشأة ناصر لم يكونوا على دراية أو علم بالسخانات الشمسية ومع ذلك رفضوا الفكرة بسبب “الغير معلوم”.

يسهل القول أن المشاريع المستدامة مثل السخانات الشمسية أمر لا بد منه من أجل إعادة تنمية المناطق الفقيرة بطريقة صحيحة فى أنحاء القاهرة, مع ذلك فإن من الضرورى اعتبار عدة عوامل أثناء ذلك. الأغلبية العظمى من المصريين يعيشون فى مناطق فقيرة لم يتم توعيتها بأهمية مثل تلك الإبتكارات, وليس لديهم وسائل التمويل لدعم ابتكارات جديدة لمجتمعهم وبيوتهم. نتيجة لتلك العوامل, هناك سلسلة من الخطوات اللازمة والتى لابد من اتخاذها من أجل تشجيع المشاريع المستدامة داخل المناطق الحضرية الفقيرة فى القاهرة.

يجب أن تكون الخيارات المتوفرة للسكان الفقراء يمكن تحمل تكلفتها أو حتى مجانية  *

لا بد من توعية السكان بفوائد إضافة أو تنمية إبتكارات مستدامة حديثة *

لا بد من أن يتم إشراك السكان فى إنشاء أو تنفيذ المشاريع, على سبيل المثال بناء سخانات شمسية أو اختيارات أخرى مستدامة لهم *

السكان فى حاجة إلى محفزات أخرى لدعم التغيرات المستدامة مثل خلق فرص للدخل *

“الإقتصاد الأخضر هو أفضل وسيلة لجذب استثمارات أكثر وخلق فرص عمل أكثر. تضع العديد من البلدان المتقدمة والنامية مثالاً جيداً على ذلك” قالها حلمى أبو العيش, رئيس المجلس المصرى الوطنى للتنافسية. لسوء الحظ فإن دعم الإقتصاد الذى يهدف إلى التنمية المستدامة بدون الإساءة إلى البيئة لم يصبح أولوية لتصور أو تنفيذ المشاريع فى مصر.

لابد من أن تبدأ مصر فى البحث عن ابتكارات مستدامة حديثة عند التنمية, خاصة فى المجتمعات الحضرية الفقيرة. لن يجنب ذلك المشكلات الصحية والبيئية والفيزيائية فقط ولكن سيكون أيضا ذا فاعلية من حيث التكلفة.

 

تخرجت سارة البيرى حديثاً من جامعة روتجر بدرجة بكالريوس فى دراسات التخطيط والسياسات العامة ودراسات الشرق الأوسط. حالياً مرشحة للحصول على

الماجستير في الإدارة العامة من جامعة روتجر مع التركيز على التنمية القومية والإقليمية.

Photo credit: Banan Abdelrahman

Photo credit: Banan Abdelrahman

With its nearly 20 million inhabitants, Cairo, can seem to be lacking any aspect of a green city–but for those looking hard, the green shoots of sustainability are everywhere.  In fact, dense, urban living is probably the best thing humans can do to make a more sustainable world and advance themselves economically.  Yet within those efforts lay lessons about the challenges and opportunities of making Cairo a greener city.

The hustle and bustle of everyday life, along with high levels of extreme poverty, often discourages people from thinking green and taking positive initiatives, as they often struggle just to get by. According to the Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS), poverty throughout Egypt is now at 26.3% and continues to increase. Due to the extraordinary levels of poverty across Egypt, many people have been forced to find ways to make a living in fast, inexpensive means, often at a cost to long term health and environmental conditions. An example of this can be found in the neighborhood of Manshiet Nasr in Cairo. Its original inhabitants known as the “Zabaleen” (garbage pickers) have as part of their entrepreneurial strategy, incorporated into their neighborhood a variety of different kinds of compost, recycling materials, garbage, etc. in order to make a living. The items are collected from across Cairo and used to create unique inventions in their homes that they can sell or to burn for gas because the neighborhood is not connected to Cairo’s gas network.  While this has clear long term health and environmental repercussions, it should be pointed out that numerous studies have shown the result of this system is one of the most efficient, and lowest-waste systems in the world.

Despite the bleak health and living conditions in Manshiet Nasr, one organization, Solar Cities, is working to improve living conditions. In 2012, native resident of Manshiet Nasr, Hanna Fathy, worked with her partner and social entrepreneur, Thomas Culhane, to develop solar heaters for the neighborhood’s residents. Solar heating systems use energy collected from the sun to produce heating and hot water for use in residential, commercial and industrial facilities. Solar heating systems are commonly found in developed urban and suburban areas but can be difficult to find in areas like Manshiet Nasr and other poor, neglected urban areas. Beginning with a single solar heating system, Solar Cities has gone on to obtain funding for 13 more solar heaters throughout Manshiet Nasr and Darb-al-Ahmar, another poor urban area in Cairo.

Photo credit: Banan Abdelrahman

Photo credit: Banan Abdelrahman

Unfortunately, as worthy as the work of Solar Cities has been, solar heating has not gained many supporters in other poor urban areas for several reasons. The first and most common reason is because of start-up costs. On average it costs $3,500 Egyptian Pounds ($650 USD) for one system. For the majority of Cairo urban inhabitants, this is an extremely unreasonable and expensive cost. Other reasons include the fear of change and misconceptions about the effects of having a solar heater in the home. Due to the rarity of solar heaters in the Cairo’s poor areas, many fear that using solar energy for heat could cause diseases and other negative consequences for those living in the home. Many of the inhabitants of Manshiet Nasr were not familiar or educated about solar heaters and rejected the idea because of the “unknown.”

It is easy to say that sustainable projects like solar heaters are imperative to properly redeveloping poor urban areas throughout Cairo, however, it is important to consider several factors when doing so. The majority of Egyptians living in poor urban areas have not been educated about the benefits of innovations such as this, and do not have the financial means to support new innovations for their community and home. Due to these factors, there are a series of necessary steps that must be taken when promoting sustainable projects in Cairo’s poor urban areas:

  • Affordable or even free options must be available for poor inhabitants;
  • Residents must be educated about the advantages of adding and/or developing new sustainable innovations;
  • Residents should be involved in the creation or implementation of projects, for example building solar heaters, or other sustainable options for them;
  • Residents need other incentives to support sustainable changes, such as income generation.

“Green economy is the best means to attract more investment and create more job opportunities. Many developed and developing countries set a good example,” said Helmi Abul-Eish, chairman of the Egyptian National Competitiveness Council (ENCC). Unfortunately, supporting an economy that aims for sustainable development without degrading the environment has not become a priority of how projects are conceived or implemented in Egypt. Egypt must start looking for modern sustainable innovations when developing, especially in poor urban societies.  Not only will this avoid future health, environment and physical issues, but it can also be cost efficient.

Sarah Elbery is a recent graduate of Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Planning & Public Policy and Middle Eastern Studies. She is currently an MPA candidate at Rutgers University with a concentration in International and Regional Development. 

Arabic translation by Samaa Abd El-Shakour, Senior Urban Planning student at Cairo University, specializing in urban anthropology and the enhancement of the quality of life in Informal areas using local resources. 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,683 other followers

%d bloggers like this: